Guns in schools

How would you feel if one of your friends or family were shot while they were trying to get an education? Think about how much this would affect you, and possibly your community. If guns in school were allowed in schools there wouldn’t be as many deaths. School shootings wouldn’t be actually prevented but they could potentially be lowered. We could protect each other if something ever happened. There are so many shootings every day we don’t even know about because they have become so common, all around the world, in america, europe and one day it could possibly be us. So what are we waiting for?

Draft essay / Ideas

How does Shakespeare get his ideas across to the audience in Macbeth?

William Shakespeare is one of the worlds most influential writers in english literature. In his time, he has written many famous plays that are known worldwide, such as Romeo and Juliet, The twelfth night, A midsummer night’s dream, and the Scottish play, or is more commonly known as Macbeth.  The way he connects with the audience is displayed by his delicate and carefully constructed use of language techniques to covey his strongest themes he wanted to put across to the audience. In Macbeth, Shakespeare has brought these selected themes to attention; ambition, nature and unnatural, manhood, and like most of the Shakespeare’s works, fate. This essay will be exploring the deteriorating state of mind and ambition in characters, that is very vividly expressed in Macbeth.

In Act 5 scene 5, just after lady Macbeth has killed herself, Macbeth says ‘Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more’. Macbeth has doubts over his fate, calling it “Life’s but a walking shadow” , he is essentially saying his entire existence is nothing but a mere ghost, and compares people to actors who enjoy their moment in the spotlight but then have no importance afterwards. Shakespeare has used a metaphor is this particular situation to express the brutal nature of life to the audience, comparing a man to “a poor player” and life to “a walking shadow” to say that life is short-lived. Shadows are gone as soon as they appear and actors only play their character, they people they play have no real meaning. Macbeth realises that the moment he decided to kill King Duncan lead to his wife killing herself because of her deteriorating mind and his audacious ambition. This shows that if only Macbeth had been happy with his life before he killed King Duncan and brought corruption on families, this would have all been avoided.

“Is this a dagger which I see before me, I have thee not, and yet I see thee still” (2.1.33-35). In this scene, Macbeth hasn’t killed Duncan yet and he sees a dagger before him that isn’t there, he is hallucinating. He is hearing voices and going crazy, his state of mind is losing grip from the real world. He is so used to seeing death, murder and bad things he has come to terms with it, and is used to it, it doesn’t affect him. As we can now come to realise, Macbeth starts off as a normal person but then slowly looses his state of mind and he isn’t the same person he was at the start of the play.

The witches play a huge part in the play, and although it has quite a lot to do with ambition, it also links to Macbeth’s deteriorating state of mind. The witches did not take over his state of mind at the start of the play when they met, that had a lot to do with ambition and Lady macbeth telling macbeth that he would only get the throne with effort. There are theories saying that the witches were only a fragment of Macbeth imagination, but i consider this to be false as in the 1600s I believe the play was written, witches were ‘real’. Macbeth knows that his actions are wrong and he could get caught but with Lady Macbeth swaying and wooing him to do it, it is done. This links back to ambition when Lady Macbeth says earlier on in the play, ‘That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty. ‘ She is so ambitious and willing for power, that she asks god to make her less like a woman and more like a man, and fill her with cruelty. She is so ambitous she is willing to do anything for power. I believe this may have lead to her death. Shakespeares message through the play is that sometimes power can corrupt.

In Act 5, Scene 1, Lady Macbeth comes into the scene sleepwalking, with the doctor and gentlewoman watching her. She seems to be rubbing her hands  as if she is washing them. She says ‘out damned spot’ and is followed by saying ” the thane had a wife” , who is lady Macduff. Later on, you hear ” Banquo’s buried: he cannot come out on’s grave” and she believes that she hears Macduff knocking at the gate. Lady Macbeth’s mind is clearly deteriorating.

‘ This is all important to Shakespeare’s message because he may be presenting the idea of imminent power corrupts people into thinking and doing things which goes against their values. This idea of mental corruption links back to the idea of Macbeth’s deteriorating mind because Macbeth will later cease to be able to distinguish between reality and fiction. Therefore, Shakespeare’s message throughout the play is how imminent power and power can corrupt normally moral people and this idea was very well known which dates back to Roman times as can be seen via a quote stating, ‘absolute power corrupts absolutely.’ –  http://dakand.community.edutronic.net/how-does-shakespeare-present-macbeths-deteriorating-state-of-mind/
I found this to be such a good message in Macbeth because i believe that it is all true.

 

 

 

 

 

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 5, Scene 1.

Characters in order of appearance:

Doctor
Gentlewoman
Lady Macbeth

Time: Night

Summary:

In the king’s palace at Dunsinane a doctor and a gentlewoman talk about Lady Macbeth’s strange habit of sleepwalking. Suddenly, Lady Macbeth enters in a trance with a candle in her hand. She’s talking about the murders of Lady Macduff and Banquo, her actions display blood on her hands and claims that nothing will ever wash it off. She leaves, and the doctor and gentlewoman talk about how she’s gone crazy.

Important Quote:

“Out, damned spot; out, I say… Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him?”

 

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 4, Scene 3.

Characters in order of appearance:

Malcolm
Macduff
Doctor
Ross

Time: Unknown

Summary:

Outside King Edward’s palace, Malcolm is with Macduff, telling him that he doesn’t trust him since he has left his family in Scotland and may be secretly working for Macbeth. To see if Macduff is trustworthy, Malcolm rambles on about his own vices. He admits that he wonders whether he is fit to be king, since he claims to be lustful, greedy, and violent. At first, Macduff politely disagrees with his future king, but eventually Macduff cannot keep himself from crying out, “O Scotland, Scotland!” Macduff’s loyalty to Scotland leads him to agree that Malcolm is not fit to govern Scotland and perhaps not even to live. In giving voice to his disparagement, Macduff has passed Malcolm’s ‘test of loyalty’. Malcolm then retracts the lies he has put forth about his supposed shortcomings and embraces Macduff as an ally.  Ross enters and says he just came from Scotland, and tells Macduff that his wife and children are okay he says Malcolm should come back, listing the bad things that have happened ever since Macbeth has been king. Malcolm says that he will return with ten thousand soldiers lent him by the English king. Then, breaking down, Ross confesses to Macduff that Macbeth has murdered his wife and children. Macduff is crushed and Malcolm tells him to turn his grief to anger, and Macduff assures him that he will inflict revenge upon Macbeth.

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 4, Scene 2.

Characters in order of appearance:

Lady Macduff
Ross
Son
Messenger
First Murderer

Time: Morning

Summary:
At Fife in Macduff’s castle, Lady Macduff is lamenting to Ross that her husband has run away which kinda makes him look suspicious but Ross says he had his reasons. Lady Macduff then has a funny bit of banter with her young son about how his father is dead. He doesn’t believe her, and they go on to discuss whether or not she should buy a new husband at the market as well as what happens to traitors. The conversation comes to an abrupt end when a messenger enters advising her to flee with her children. Since she’s innocent, she sees no reason to leave. Then again, she thinks, this is Earth, where sometimes people are praised for doing evil things and punished for doing good things. So being innocent may not be a good reason to stay put. Unfortunately, in the time it takes her to figure this out, the murderers have arrived. One of the murderers says they’re looking for Macduff, who is a traitor. Macduff’s son retorts are stabbed and then dies, leaving the murderers to kill Lady Macduff.

 

 

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 4, Scene 1.

Characters in order of appearance:

First Witch
Second Witch
Third Witch
Hecate
Macbeth

Time: Night

Summary:
On a dark and stormy night, the three witches are together in a cave chanting spells around a boiling cauldron, they put in all sorts of nasty stuff, from lizard’s leg to the finger of a stillborn baby. Hecate enters, pleased with the witches’ more serious approach this time around. After Hecate exits, the Second With announces “something wicked this way comes.” Not surprisingly, Macbeth comes. He says he has some more questions about his future and he wants some answers from the weird sisters, now. The witches add some more ingredients to the cauldron, and then apparitions begin to appear, each addressing Macbeth. First, an armed head warns him to beware of Macduff. The second apparition is a bloody child who says that Macbeth won’t be harmed by anyone who was “of woman born.” (Everyone) Including Macduff. So really Macbeth figures he has nothing to fear. He welcomes this good but figures he might as well have Macduff killed anyway—you know, just to be sure. The third apparition is a child wearing a crown and holding a tree in his hand. The child promises that Macbeth won’t be conquered until Birnam Wood marches to Dunsinane. This seems about as unlikely as Macduff not being born of a woman. Given all of this, Macbeth feels safe that he won’t be conquered in the upcoming war. But again, to be on the safe side, he still asks if Banquo’s children will ever rule the kingdom. He is warned to ask no more questions. He demands to be answered anyway. Macbeth is not pleased when he’s shown a line of eight kings, the last of which holds a mirror that reflects on many more such kings. One of the kings in the mirror happens to be holding two orbs. (King James I of England / King James VI of Scotland traced his lineage back to Banquo and, at his coronation ceremony in England 1603 James held two orbs one representing England and one representing Scotland. ) Quite a coincidence, don’t you think? The apparitions disappear and the witches tease Macbeth for looking horrible when he saw his future destruction. The witches do another song and dance routine and they vanish. Enter Lennox to find a perplexed Macbeth. Lennox tells Macbeth the news that Macduff has definitely run away to England, presumably to get some help for a rebellion. NOTE: Macbeth says that from now on, he’s going to act immediately on whatever thought enters his mind: “From this moment / The very firstlings of my heart shall be / The firstlings of my hand.” In other words, no more thinking and contemplating about the pros and cons of being bad – he’s just going to do whatever the heck he feels like doing. Starting with… wiping out Macduff’s entire family, especially his kids, since Macbeth doesn’t ever want to see any little Macduffs running around.

Important quote:

“From this moment / The very firstlings of my heart shall be / The firstlings of my hand.”

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 3, Scene 6.

Characters in order of appearance:

Lennox
A Lord

Time: Unknown

Summary: While all the other things are happening, elsewhere in Scotland the nobleman Lennox discusses Scotland’s plight with another lord. Isn’t it weird that Duncan was murdered, that his run-away sons were blamed, that Banquo has now been murdered, that his runaway son (Fleance) is being blamed, and that everyone has a major case of déjà vu? Plus, the murders of Banquo and Duncan were too conveniently grieved by Macbeth, who had the most to gain from the deaths. Lennox refers to Macbeth as a “tyrant,” and then asks the other Lord if he knows where Macduff has gone off to. Turns out Macduff has joined Malcolm in England. Malcolm and Macduff are doing a pretty good job of convincing the oh-so-gracious and “pious” King Edward of England, along with some English noblemen, to help them in the fight against Macbeth, the tyrant. The two noblemen pray that Malcolm and Macduff might be successful and restore some order to the kingdom, even though news of the planned rebellion has reached Macbeth and he’s preparing for war. Sorry to say, it’s not looking too good for Macbeth at this point.

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 3, Scene 5.

Characters in order of appearance:

First Witch
Hecate

Time: Unknown

Summary:
The witches again meet at an open place, this time with Hecate, the goddess of witches, who sounds angry. Hecate lays into the weird sisters in a lengthy, rhyming soliloquy. She’s super irritated that they were meddling in the affairs of Macbeth without consulting her first, as she would’ve done a better job. She points out that Macbeth isn’t devoted to them but only to himself. But, fine, Hecate will clean up this mess. She tells them to all meet in the morning when Macbeth will come to know his destiny, whatever that means. Then there’s a  witch song and dance and they leave.

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 3, Scene 4.

Characters in order of appearance:

Macbeth
Lords
Lady Macbeth
First Murderer
Lennox
Ross

Time: Night

Summary:
At the dinner party, the couple welcomes their guests. When the first murderer enters as everyone is being seated, Macbeth quickly goes to see him, and the murderer says he has killed Banquo but Fleance has escaped. Macbeth re-enters the room, then, Banquo’s ghost shows up but because the ghost is silent, he gets to creep around before anyone notices. While the guests are busy having a good time, Macbeth raises a toast and calls special attention to Banquo’s absence. He hopes Banquo is just running late or being rude and that nothing bad has happened to him, this is quite ironic as Banquo’s ghost is in the room. Again Macbeth is invited to sit on the spot where Banquo’s ghost is sitting. Macbeth goes into a hysterical fit, and the lords all take notice. Lady Macbeth excuses her husband for these “momentary” fits he has had since childhood. She urges them to keep eating, and then corners Macbeth, who is still hysterical. Lady Macbeth asks if Macbeth is a man because he’s not acting like one so much as he is acting like a sissy. She tells him to get it together—there’s nothing but a stool in front of him. This “ghost” business is all in his head. Meanwhile, Macbeth is discoursing with the ghost that only he sees, and then it disappears. He swears to Lady Macbeth that the ghost was there, and then laments that it used to be that when you dashed a man’s brains out he would die. Everything is just getting back to normal when the ghost reappears. Again Macbeth calls out a toast to the missing Banquo (he’s just asking for it now). When he sees that the ghost has returned, Macbeth screams at him for being so spooky. He says if Banquo were to appear in any physical form—even a Russian bear—Macbeth would take him on, no problem. The ghost leaves again and Macbeth tells everyone to stay put.  Lady Macbeth lets him know that he’s killed the mood. It’s pretty clear the party’s over.  Macbeth tries to recover, and he even questions everyone else asking how they can be so calm in the face of such horrible sights. Um…what sights? they want to know. Lady Macbeth tells the concerned lords to leave immediately. Pronto. NOW. After they exit, Macbeth philosophizes that blood will have blood. In other words, this ain’t over yet. Morning is now approaching, and Macbeth points out that Macduff never showed at the party. He lets out that he has had a spy in Macduff’s house. He promises to go to the witches the next day and says that he’s so far into this bloody business that there’s no turning back now. Lady Macbeth suggests that maybe he just needs a good night’s sleep, and so they go off to bed.

 

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth- Act 3, Scene 3.

Characters in order of appearance:

First Murderer
Third Murderer
Second Murderer
Banquo

Time: Night

Summary:
The hired murderers met, and when they heard horses a signal was given, and his son Fleance were attacked. One of the murderers blew out the lantern and the job was left half done because although Banquo was killed, Fleance escaped.